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-   -   Allen Bradley labs for noob? (http://www.plctalk.net/qanda/showthread.php?t=113565)

cityjack January 1st, 2018 10:10 AM

Allen Bradley labs for noob?
 
Good morning all and Happy New Year.

Its been a year since I've taken Mr. Beaufort's class down in SC. That had to be the most informative yet grueling class I have taken since college. But unfortunately due to a crazy work schedule and life, I have not been able to practice what I learned and time with PLCs other than watching the control guys at work, I have done nothing.
However I did get the company to fork over some money and with the guidance of the control guys at work, I purchased a Control logix controller, power supply, and a digital and analog input/output card. We did also buy a end card piece I believe was some sort of terminator at the end of the cards I was told we needed. I forget actually what it was called and what its used for.
I have been given the time this year and the funds to buy and build my own trainer as well as a place to practice.

I need some practice labs or a set somewhat like that eUniversity site has. Beginning to advanced then more advanced. Something I can work through over the year. I am told we have Studio 5000 licenses available and a pc is not a problem.

Please, any guidance would be most helpful.

Thank you again.

Sid

Aabeck January 1st, 2018 11:44 AM

What I still do for 'practice' is when I see something in the world I wonder if I can program that.

Traffic lights, emergency light bars on construction vehicles (which morphed into a working model Ghostbusters car), security systems, etc.

Pick a function (like time controlled outputs) and have one turn on for a period, off if the button is pressed.

Another to get used to using the clock functions - program a security light to come on at night, vary the start minute every time it turns on with a counter pointing to an integer file of random numbers from 1 to 59 (so it doesn't look like a timer controlled light), and throughout the year change the start hour as the sunset changes

Other things may include:
Switching from the controlled meter power to the main electrical for the air conditioner compressor when the controlled meter shuts off
Monitoring a battery level and giving indicators of the charge level (way too low, low, good, full, overcharged), and control a battery charger to keep them fully charged.
For timer, counter and sequencer programming think of a few things to do with holiday lights (I would say Christmas lights, but, P.C. or you get admonished lately)
Try to program a 2 story elevator, then a 3 or 4 story one.

A_G January 2nd, 2018 08:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aabeck (Post 763692)
What I still do for 'practice' is when I see something in the world I wonder if I can program that.

Traffic lights, emergency light bars on construction vehicles (which morphed into a working model Ghostbusters car), security systems, etc.

Pick a function (like time controlled outputs) and have one turn on for a period, off if the button is pressed.

Another to get used to using the clock functions - program a security light to come on at night, vary the start minute every time it turns on with a counter pointing to an integer file of random numbers from 1 to 59 (so it doesn't look like a timer controlled light), and throughout the year change the start hour as the sunset changes

Other things may include:
Switching from the controlled meter power to the main electrical for the air conditioner compressor when the controlled meter shuts off
Monitoring a battery level and giving indicators of the charge level (way too low, low, good, full, overcharged), and control a battery charger to keep them fully charged.
For timer, counter and sequencer programming think of a few things to do with holiday lights (I would say Christmas lights, but, P.C. or you get admonished lately)
Try to program a 2 story elevator, then a 3 or 4 story one.

I agree with this, when I was starting to learn PLC programming I made up a project for myself. It was basically a water detector sensor circuit. The water detector sensor and power supply can be bought online. I also bought some relays, on/off pushbuttons and indicator lights. Then wire it all up and write some logic. Like, if the "system active" pushbutton is on, and the water detector sensor goes off, turn on the alarm light. Try a few different setups. This helped me a lot.

cityjack January 2nd, 2018 09:35 PM

Thank you very much for the input guys.

Have a good week.

Sid

RET January 3rd, 2018 10:42 AM

Just setup a virtual test bench using something like Advanced HMI.

cityjack January 3rd, 2018 04:50 PM

Advanced HMI
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RET (Post 763847)
Just setup a virtual test bench using something like Advanced HMI.

I went here http://www.advancedhmi.com/

Is this the place you are talking about sir? Not too sure exactly what to download here, but I'll look around.

Thank you again.

Sid

Aabeck January 3rd, 2018 04:59 PM

Click on the link that reads:
Download the development software for free.

Then go to Microsoft.com and download Visual Studio Community (any year) (free to use) and on the computer go to Windows Features and enable all .NET features.


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