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Old January 8th, 2019, 07:20 PM   #1
Tim Ganz
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DIN Rail Mounting Screw Size

Building a small panel to replace an existing panel that is a rat's nest and has mostly rusted away.

Using #10 hex key button head crews to mount the slotted DIN rail but with the fact that most interior panels are thin should I use 10-24 or 10-32?

I am thinking I may be better served with 10-32 holes but I think they would be more likely to break when tapping?

What do you think?
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Old January 8th, 2019, 08:14 PM   #2
OkiePC
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Thinner means fewer threads are possible, so it is less likely to strip out if you go with fine threads (10-32). Tap magic is your friend, and will make the tap last longer and less likely to break.

I know it would make my machinist buddies cringe, but for small holes in a backplate, I will often chuck up the tap in my cordless dewalt and clutch it down really low. You usually only need to reverse a couple of times to break chips and using a drill to drive a tap makes quick work of it. Bad habit, yes, but with a little practice and good quality taps, it is quick.
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Old January 8th, 2019, 08:44 PM   #3
Maxkling
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These actually work very well.

https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DWADT1...47403110&psc=1

Tip, do not use a drill, use an impact driver. Most bad reviews these things get are because of improper use.
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Old January 8th, 2019, 09:26 PM   #4
bill4807
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I use 10-32 by 1/2" for backplate type components.
I also use the drill tap combo bit like in the previous link. Except not dewalt, I bought the Greenlee kit. Comes with like 4 different sizes. Your local electrical supplier should sell them, Or online.
Just use some oil, like tap magic like okiepc mentioned, and I like to predrill all of them with a small bit first just to save the "drill" part for times when I don't have access to a smaller bit.

Last edited by bill4807; January 8th, 2019 at 09:28 PM.
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Old January 8th, 2019, 10:11 PM   #5
5618
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I run 10-32 taps often with a drill. I use HSS, spiral point taps, a.k.a. gun taps. The leading edge is angled to push the chips ahead. No reversing needed. (normally)
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Old January 8th, 2019, 10:41 PM   #6
GaryS
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Self drilling
Here what I have been using them for years. The work very well go in fast nice large head to prevent pullout low profile so they don't use much space.
I use these on din rail and wireways for mounting other devices directly to the panel I use 10-32 or 1/4-20 for large items.
for tapping I have used a cordless drill with clutch fast and simple.
for those that have access to Snapon tools they have a set of sockets for taps
NO.6 up through 1/2 screw size. 1/4 - 1/2 drive use a 1/4 hex to square adaptor on a drill.
A lot faster then tapping by hand an I find I brake less taps in the process.
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Last edited by GaryS; January 8th, 2019 at 10:43 PM.
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Old January 9th, 2019, 10:01 AM   #7
Tom Jenkins
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I got tired of breaking taps and related hassles. I went to this:

https://www.mcmaster.com/jack-nuts

https://www.mcmaster.com/installatio...bed-rivet-nuts
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Old January 9th, 2019, 03:57 PM   #8
lesmar96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryS View Post
Self drilling
Here what I have been using them for years. The work very well go in fast nice large head to prevent pullout low profile so they don't use much space.
I use these on din rail and wireways for mounting other devices directly to the panel I use 10-32 or 1/4-20 for large items.
for tapping I have used a cordless drill with clutch fast and simple.
for those that have access to Snapon tools they have a set of sockets for taps
NO.6 up through 1/2 screw size. 1/4 - 1/2 drive use a 1/4 hex to square adaptor on a drill.
A lot faster then tapping by hand an I find I brake less taps in the process.
Yes. we use self-tapping for din rail and wire duct too and it has never given us problems. Much faster than drilling and tapping.
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Old January 10th, 2019, 03:38 AM   #9
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Have mentioned these before, they roll the thread as you screw them in, so there are no metal bits that you normally get with self tappers:

http://www.holbrookinc.com/products/taptite_ii

Also they are not circular but are tri-lobular so that they are vibration resistant. Finally you can even use them to tap holes for other screws if needed because they form standard threads. Various people make them, search for 'taptite screw'.
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Old January 10th, 2019, 11:03 AM   #10
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When I worked in a panel shop:
for wire duct Panduit rivets and rivet tool.
https://www.panduit.com/en/products/...ries/nr1c.html


https://www.panduit.com/en/products/...tools/tnr.html

Everything else pan head screws.
Tapped using a drill with no issues.
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Old January 10th, 2019, 11:06 AM   #11
Archie
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Does no one use metric screws?


If you intend to follow NFPA 79, then here are a few highlights to consider:
11.2.1.5 Threaded fasteners with machine threads shall be used to attach components to a subplate

11.2.5.1 Steel subplate thickness shall provide engagement of at least 2 full threads

11.2.1.5.4 Sheet metal screw, rivets, welds, solders, or bonding materials shall not be used to mount component to subplate

Exception: Rivets shall be permitted to be used for attaching mounting rails and wiring channels provided the exposed surface is smooth and free from any portion of a protruding stud.

The self drilling screws which are often used by electricians are typically sheet metal screws, therefore would not be NFPA79 compliant.
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Old January 10th, 2019, 11:14 AM   #12
OkiePC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BryanG View Post
Have mentioned these before, they roll the thread as you screw them in, so there are no metal bits that you normally get with self tappers:

http://www.holbrookinc.com/products/taptite_ii

Also they are not circular but are tri-lobular so that they are vibration resistant. Finally you can even use them to tap holes for other screws if needed because they form standard threads. Various people make them, search for 'taptite screw'.
This looks ideal. Where can I buy a few hundred of these in 10-32, 1.2" panhead, Phillips or torx drive?
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Old January 10th, 2019, 12:03 PM   #13
Helliana
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I personally like 8-32. They are a little more forgiving in placement, and sometimes I've had issues with the heads of a 10-32 panhead being too tall and interfering with devices snapping on the din rail.
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Old January 10th, 2019, 01:07 PM   #14
Saffa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Archie View Post
Does no one use metric screws?

.
Here in upside down land we do! 5 or 6mm machine screws for most things.

Drill and tap, tap is a battery drill type. I have one drill with the drill bit fitted and another with the tap bit so no changing bits. Use cutting oil.
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Old January 10th, 2019, 01:59 PM   #15
BryanG
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Quote:
Does no one use metric screws?
I was worried in case I caused offense by directing the OP to a website with metric at the top of the page, his question stated imperial sizes. In Britain we need keep all the international friends we can find, after we told 27 of our nearest neighbours that we can do better without them.

Quote:
Drill and tap, tap is a battery drill type. I have one drill with the drill bit fitted and another with the tap bit so no changing bits. Use cutting oil.
So you have one operation to drill the panel, stop and put down the drill, pick up the next one with the tap in it, dip the end in cutting oil, drive it in, then drive it out, then put that machine down, then clean away excess oil and the little bits of metal that come out of the tap, then pick up a device to fit and tighten the screw being careful not to cross thread, perhaps adding a shakeproof washer. How much time could you save if you missed out the tapping bit but still ended up with M4, M5 and M6 tapped holes. I really should buy shares in one of these Taptite companies.
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