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Unread July 2nd, 2005, 08:07 PM   #16
just_lionel
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Ive always wanted to learn German and Russian. Looks like Italian would be something else good for me to learn. (We have alot of German and Italian equipment. I always wanted to learn Russian for some odd reason)
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Unread July 3rd, 2005, 09:54 AM   #17
sapoleon
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hi
just a little correction... the dictionary page is

http://dict.leo.org/

there is other german dictionary that I like, it is not only to english in:

http://www.pons.de



other page I sometimes use is

http://www.freetranslation.com

and btw, I would like to learn japanese. I started, made one year of the six, and have to leave it because i moved... twice really. must start again.
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Unread July 4th, 2005, 10:38 PM   #18
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fun with languages

Quote:
Originally Posted by rsdoran
Thats how German works. English (at least ours) has over a million words in the vocabulary, German (Deutsch) has around 80,000. They put words together to create words to express ideas.

In this case you are seeing the verb "fahren", which means to ride or drive (run but not jog type). They use things like abfahren to mean not run, not drive etc...stopenfuhr or something along those lines would mean "stop running" or "stop the drive"....it has alot to do with context, in this case a machine.

BTW its probably stoppenfuhr, stoppen means to halt, freeze, stop running and a multitude of other decease and desist type applications. I am use to Anschlag, or some variation thereof, for the estop.

Maybe some one that actually speaks the language will chime in.

actually, it seems like the oxford dict has something like half a million words in it and the duden, which is the standard reference for german language has only a fourth of that. in my opinion that does include the agglutinated words, but i might be wrong.

as for putting words together to make new ones: i think the very same happens in english, doesn't it? except in english you don't write them together. like: 'foerderband' == 'conveyor belt'

'stopenfuhr' doesn't make any sense to me. close would be 'stop einfuhr' which could be a badly translated (maybe from english?) 'infeed stop'. what was it supposed to mean?

'abfahren' is to depart (i've never heard anybody using it for a machine, but then i'm not working in germany, so maybe somebody does actually use it). do you mean 'anfahren'? that would be to start (a machine or production for example) - but it also means to hit a person with a car, btw.

'not-aus' in my opinion is an emergency power off, while 'not-stop' is stopping (probably actively) the machine. maybe i'm wrong, but i would think that if your machine room gets flooded all of a sudden it might be better to hit the 'not-aus' than the 'not-stop', since i figure that stop means to stop and not neccessarily to cut the power supply afterwards.

'anschlag' is something that is used to hinder movement further a certain point. is that a block in english?

well, i've got some problems of my own and maybe some of you guys could help me: those dictionaries are all very nice but they never tell you about whether that word is right for the context. can somebody please tell me the correct verbs for the cycle of a pump?
it fills ampoules from liquid in a tank. so when in the first phase the pump is filled with the liquid is that 'to suck in'? 'to charge'??? then the pump stops moving for a moment while the filling needles are lowered. is that a 'resting position', 'dwelling position'??? now the fluid is forced out of the pump - 'discharge'? 'evacuate'? and, since we don't want that drop at the needle's tip to fall into the ampoule, we move the piston slightly up. what's that called? 'sucking back'?? that's what one of my co-workers came up with. sounds funny to me but, i don't know better.

anybody? thanks in advance!
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Unread July 4th, 2005, 11:16 PM   #19
Eric Nelson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered
...can somebody please tell me the correct verbs for the cycle of a pump?
it fills ampoules from liquid in a tank. so when in the first phase the pump is filled with the liquid is that 'to suck in'? 'to charge'??? then the pump stops moving for a moment while the filling needles are lowered. is that a 'resting position', 'dwelling position'??? now the fluid is forced out of the pump - 'discharge'? 'evacuate'? and, since we don't want that drop at the needle's tip to fall into the ampoule, we move the piston slightly up. what's that called? 'sucking back'?? that's what one of my co-workers came up with. sounds funny to me but, i don't know better.
Any of the words you chose would be appropriate. In the first phase, I would choose "charging" over "suck in". Actually "filling" or "prefilling" (the needle) would be fine also.

The 'resting period' could be called "dwell" or "wait position", or even "charged" as the step following "charging". Maybe "filled" if you use "filling" as the first step?

I think "discharge" is the best word to decribe emptying the needle.

Although funny, "suck back" is a common term that would be easily understood.

I'm sure others might have suggestions as to better 'descriptive' words for these steps...



-Eric
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Unread July 5th, 2005, 02:49 PM   #20
trojan_goat
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Correct word in German for "Emergency Stop" is

"Dringlichkeitsanschlag"

Push the Emergency Stop Button!
Betätigen Sie die DringlichkeitscStop-Taste!
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Unread July 5th, 2005, 10:01 PM   #21
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thanks a lot Eric, now i can deliver my documentation with less fear being laughed at..

-> trojan_goat, sorry that's exactly why i was asking the questions. your 'dringlichkeitsanschlag' is pretty funny and not comprehensible, while 'dringlichkeitsstop' would be understood by most i guess, but still sounds funny.

('dringlichkeitsanschlag' would translate in sth. like 'urgent block' with block being sth. physical. 'dringlich' is rather 'urgent' than an emergency. as i said, i would suggest 'not-stop', or maybe 'not-aus' - where 'aus' means 'off'. (in my opinion if sth. stops the machine then it should be -stop and if it merely switches it off it should say -aus - but maybe that is standardised somewhere.))

stop used to be written 'stop' but now it has been changed to 'stopp' by the bureaucrats (there's no phonetic difference). traffic signs still say 'stop', though...
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Unread July 5th, 2005, 10:16 PM   #22
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hungarian phrasebook for engineers

"i will not buy this record, it is scratched!"

??? "...ahh! main motor inverter overload!"
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Unread July 5th, 2005, 11:31 PM   #23
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This is one of, if not the main reason I am taking deutsch. I have worked with several German built machines from different manufacturers and in several cases they used different terms for the same application.

For ESTOP I have seen these terms and more:
anschlag - with more than 1 term added with it.
Not-Aus also Not-Aus-Einrichtung
Nothalt
Notschalter (I think this may be a southern Germany/Italy thing.)

I worked on machines made in Germany that had English on the controls and display but the plc program is in German. It uses "stopp" ...Stopp Messer (knife). These programs were written before the changes in the german language were made.

My comment pertaining to the vocabulary (maybe thats the wrong term) were not stated derogatorically, it was a statement based on what my Instructor and my class book stated. There are differences and that is one of them...has nothing to do with good or bad...if one is better or worst. They are both languages that many people use in their everyday life but I do not know deutsch yet but that will change.

Alles gute. Viel Gluck. Ich habe eine examen auf Deutsch morgen früh.
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Unread July 6th, 2005, 03:41 AM   #24
Ken M
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Quote:
"i will not buy this record, it is scratched!"
OK, unregistered, you're not the only one who thought of this!
Surely we're not alone ...!

http://bau2.uibk.ac.at/sg/python/Scr...rasebookSketch
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Unread July 6th, 2005, 09:58 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rsdoran
...
For ESTOP I have seen these terms and more:
anschlag - with more than 1 term added with it.
Not-Aus also Not-Aus-Einrichtung
Nothalt
Notschalter (I think this may be a southern Germany/Italy thing.)

I worked on machines made in Germany that had English on the controls and display but the plc program is in German. It uses "stopp" ...Stopp Messer (knife). These programs were written before the changes in the german language were made.

My comment pertaining to the vocabulary (maybe thats the wrong term) were not stated derogatorically, it was a statement based on what my Instructor and my class book stated. There are differences and that is one of them...has nothing to do with good or bad...if one is better or worst. They are both languages that many people use in their everyday life but I do not know deutsch yet but that will change.

Alles gute. Viel Gluck. Ich habe eine examen auf Deutsch morgen früh.

hey rsdoran,

i didn't take it derogatory at all. it's just that since i'm terribly curious i tried to get more sources for the information and apparently the numbers are a bit different. which i don't really care about, but i thought you might be interested in the information. according to the oxford dictionary's web page (and wikipedia too, btw) - "that type of" english has half a million entries. which is an amazing lot, i think. http://www.oed.com/tour/step-2.html
merriam-webster has apparently fewer words (470.000)

according to the duden homepage, which is supposed to be the authoritative source for information about german language, german has about 125000 words. and that does apparently include words that are being put together (agglutinated?). would be interesting to know, why there is such a huge difference, regarding both of them are pretty closely related and underwent more or less the same influences (at least in europe, i guess). i'm kind of curious as to why that might be. anybody with a linguistic background wanting to share his insight?

also i think too, that there's none of them inferior to the other. the concepts are simply too similar to give any of the two an advantage (like not being able to express certain things or making differences between different times of action etc. - once a friend asked me, how germans could get by with so few tempi...). and given each of them has many times the amount of vocabulary a human can memorise there's no real gain in having more, i guess.

stopp was a spelling mistake until recently, btw.:
(in case anybody actually cares)
http://uploader.wuerzburg.de/rechtsc...o-a-z.html#s/S

'notschalter' and 'nothalt' are both valid in my opinion. there's probably not much need for bikeshedding about this. after all, if it's still comprehendible and there's always worse. for example: the japanese write 'wheel' as 'hooiru' (put the stress on the 'i', then it makes a bit more sense) which took me a while to figure out.

good luck with your exam.

-> Ken: thanks for the link. interesting resources..


should a new thread for ranting/making fun about internationalisation issues be started? could be fun from time to time. also i could use some new automation jokes.. anybody?
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Unread July 7th, 2005, 07:41 AM   #26
RMA
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Quote:

I worked on machines made in Germany that had English on the controls and display but the plc program is in German. It uses "stopp" ...Stopp Messer (knife). These programs were written before the changes in the german language were made.



The reason for the use of two "p"s is because "stopp" is the imperative of the German verb "stoppen", to stop. As you say, this was the case, even before the recent changes in German spelling and grammar. As far as the traffic "Stop" sign with a single "p" is concerned, I suspect this may have more to do with international standards than anything else.
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Unread November 19th, 2019, 02:53 PM   #27
JRW
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memding

This was 2005
and our friend Ron passed away
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Unread November 20th, 2019, 05:06 PM   #28
Ken Roach
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Please don't use our technical community forum to advertise your essay fraud scam. It's especially galling because you chose a thread started by our old friend Ron Doran.

Fortunately you're weak and lazy and it doesn't take much effort to ban you.
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