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Old October 17th, 2008, 12:12 PM   #1
MartB
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Standard Wire Colors For 240v In Malaysia

Can anyone help with providing the correct color standard for single phase 240v AC in Malaysia?

We've had a look around the web but can't find a definitive answer.

Thanks in advance.
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Old October 17th, 2008, 08:30 PM   #2
leitmotif
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I think the question came up here several months ago.

In USA there is a loose guideline common practice may be a better term
Brown Orange Yellow A, B, C for 480
Black Red Blue A, B, C for 240.
Grounded conductor is white or gray
Grounding conductor is green green/yellow stripe or bare.

If mine and I took two phases of 240 (say B and C) to get single phase I would then use the colors Red and Blue.

Dan Bentler
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Old October 18th, 2008, 09:15 AM   #3
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I've commissioned three jobs in Malaysia in the past 2 years. All three in Kuala Lumpur.

Based on my exposure to the technology level that I've been applying (printing), the 'color codes' of wires aren't as important in Malaysia as they are here in the USA. Some of this is because they are very familiar with equipment coming in from all over the world, each with its own standards. The 'region' of Malaysia might make a difference, as well (Penang, etc.), so keep that in mind.

[I'm guessing that your trying to get a detail right inside a control panel.]

Send me a PM, and I can hook you up with a local techy for some insight.

Last edited by jdbrandt; October 18th, 2008 at 09:21 AM.
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Old October 18th, 2008, 05:45 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdbrandt
I've commissioned three jobs in Malaysia in the past 2 years. All three in Kuala Lumpur.

Based on my exposure to the technology level that I've been applying (printing), the 'color codes' of wires aren't as important in Malaysia as they are here in the USA. Some of this is because they are very familiar with equipment coming in from all over the world, each with its own standards. The 'region' of Malaysia might make a difference, as well (Penang, etc.), so keep that in mind.

[I'm guessing that your trying to get a detail right inside a control panel.]

Send me a PM, and I can hook you up with a local techy for some insight.
Mart
Found this on Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-phase_electric_power

I suppose it will confuse you further BUT the upside is the rest of the world seems to be confused so why not you also??


Dan Bentler
[edit] Color codes

Conductors of a three phase system are usually identified by a color code, to allow for balanced loading and to assure the correct phase rotation for induction motors. Colors used may adhere to International Standard IEC 60446, older standards, or to no standard at all, and may vary even within a single installation. For example, in the U.S. and Canada, different color codes are used for grounded (earthed) and un-grounded systems.

L1L2L3NeutralGround /
Protective EarthUnited States
(common practice1)BlackRedBlueWhite or GrayGreen, Green/yellow striped or a bare copper wireUnited States
(alternative practice2)BrownOrangeYellowGray or WhiteGreenCanada (mandatory)[4]RedBlackBlueWhiteGreen (or bare copper)Canada (isolated three-phase installations)[5]OrangeBrownYellowWhiteGreenEurope and many other countries, including UK from April 2004 (IEC 60446), Hong Kong from July 2007BrownBlackGreyBlueGreen/yellow striped4Older European (IEC 60446, varies by country6)Black or brownBlack or brownBlack or brownBlueGreen/yellow striped5UK until April 2006, Hong Kong until April 2009, South Africa, MalaysiaRedYellowBlueBlackGreen/yellow striped (green on installations approx. before 1970)PakistanRedYellowBlueBlackGreenIndiaRedYellow BlueBlackGreenAustralia and New Zealand (per AS/NZS 3000:2000 Section 3.8.1)Red3White3 (prev. yellow)Blue3BlackGreen/yellow striped (green on very old installations)People's Republic of China (per GB 50303-2002 Section 15.2.2)YellowGreenRedLight BlueGreen/yellow striped
Note 1: Since 1975, the U.S. National Electric Code has not specified coloring of phase conductors. It is common practice in many regions to identify 120/208Y conductors as Black/Red/Blue. Local regulations may amend the N.E.C.

Note 2: The U.S. National Electric Code does not specify coloring of phase conductors. It is common practice in many regions to identify 277/480Y conductors as Brown/Orange/Yellow. Local practice may amend the N.E.C. The US N.E.C. rule 517.160 (5) states these colors are to be used for isolated power systems in health care facilities. Color of conductors does not identify voltage of a circuit, because there is no formal standard.

Note 3: In Australia and New Zealand, any colour is permitted except green/yellow, green or yellow. Yellow is no longer permitted in the 2007 revision of wiring code ASNZS 3000.

Note that in the U.S. a green/yellow striped wire may indicate an Isolated ground[citation needed]. In most countries today, green/yellow striped wire may only be used for protective earth (safety ground), and may never be unconnected or used for any other purpose.

Note 4: The international standard green-yellow marking of protective-earth conductors was introduced to reduce the risk of confusion by color blind installers. About 7% to 10% of men cannot clearly distinguish between red and green, which is a particular concern in older schemes were red marks a live conductor and green marks protective earth (U.S. terminology: safety ground).

Note 5: In Europe there still exist installations with older colors for protective earth, but since the early 1970s, all new installations use green/yellow according to IEC 60446.

Note 6: See Paul Cook: Harmonised colours and alphanumeric marking. IEE Wiring Matters, Spring 2006.



[edit] See also
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Old October 20th, 2008, 07:09 AM   #5
MartB
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Thanks for all the information guys, I appreciate your time and trouble.
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Old October 30th, 2008, 05:40 PM   #6
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From a local tech...

My local (Malaysia) technician tells me the following:

our standard color codes is L1=Red,L2=Yellow,L3=Blue,Neutral=Black,Ground=Gree n/yellow striped

Information accuracy guaranteed, or your money back.

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Thanks for all the information guys, I appreciate your time and trouble.
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Old October 31st, 2008, 06:07 AM   #7
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Awesome - thanks.

We have sent this information to the customer for final approval. There has been a lot of confusion over this (at our office anyway) so we just want an ok from them that we're using the correct color scheme.
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Old November 2nd, 2008, 03:25 AM   #8
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Some years ago the colours of external flex cables were changed from red, black & green to brown, blue & green/yellow as the red & blue appear as brown to many people with colour blindness.
more recently the "Harmonised colours" for Europe have changed to brown, Grey, Black & Yellow/green, this happened to co-incide with the Part P certs (how convienient) so any new part of an installation would contain the new colours as the old coloured cables (multicore or twin & earth) were phased out.
In many parts of Europe control panel wiring would be "identified" but all black for phases, generally brown for 110v, & some other colour for dc voltages, however many companies had their own standard for different voltages.
I once worked on some japanese machines where the colours were white for phase, green for neutral & RED for earth!.
Yep there were some big bangs when fitted to a 240v plug & switched on!.
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